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Partnerships for Native Health Washington State University

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Our pursuit of understanding transcends place

Our quest for knowledge goes beyond borders to find the seekers who, with us, can make a positive difference in the lives of others. Washington State University and the University of Colorado Denver collaborate on the Center of Excellence in American Indian and Alaska Native Health Disparities. Read about its vital work in this latest newsletter from the Community Action Board.

Call for Applications for the Pilot Project Program

We are pleased to share our Call for Applications for the Native Center for Alcohol Research and Education (NCARE) Pilot Project Program. Letters of Intent will be due May 29th, 2020.

This Call for Applications is aimed at promoting innovative research projects that focus on reducing the burden of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in American Indian and Alaska Native communities (AI/AN) and that will subsequently lead to future external funding.

While preference will be given to junior investigators, mid-career and senior researchers who have not conducted alcohol intervention research in Native communities are eligible to apply.

Please refer to the Call for Applications page for eligibility criteria, full application details, and application forms.

Hypertension: History, Impact, and Interventions (webinar)

February 25th from 12:30-1:30pm PT. The event is free, but registration is required

How and why do we measure blood pressure (BP)? Does it matter? How do we decide if BP is too high (a condition known as hypertension) and whether that is a result of aging, bad luck, or a disease? If it’s a disease, when and how should we treat it? How does hypertension interact with other diseases, and does race or ethnicity increase (or decrease) the risks of high BP?

This presentation will provide a brief history of our developing understanding of hypertension’s central role in cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and stroke. In particular, it will include a selective review of the research results which have driven diagnostic and treatment guidelines and public health policies over the past century.

The presenter, Dr. Umans, is Director of the Biomarker, Biochemistry and Biorepository Core and of the Field Studies Division at MedStar Health Research Institute Over the past 14 years, his primary research focus has been on the staggering disparities in cardiovascular disease and related disorders that affect American Indian and Alaska Native populations nationwide.

This free webinar is part of the Native-CHART Webinar Series. Native-CHART (Native-Controlling Hypertension And Risk Through Technology) aims to improve control of blood pressure and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease in American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders with diagnosed hypertension. The research center is housed within the Institute for Research and Education to Advance Community Health (IREACH) at WSU.

Native Center For Alcohol Research And Education Call For Applications

The primary intent of the Native Center for Alcohol Research and Education (NCARE) Pilot Project Grant Program is to fund and foster innovative research projects that focus on reducing the burden of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. The secondary intent of the Pilot Project Grant Program is to support and provide mentorship to junior investigators during the development of their novel approaches to improving the lives of AI/AN people.

This call for grant applications is to promote research projects that focus on reducing the burden of alcohol use disorders in AI/AN communities that will subsequently lead to future external funding. Preference will be given to junior investigators, although mid-career and senior researchers who have not conducted alcohol intervention research in Native communities are also eligible to apply. Please refer to the NCARE website for an overview video, full application details, and application forms.

Initial application materials must be submitted for first review by September 30, 2019, at 4:30PM PST.

If you are interested in learning more about the NCARE Pilot Project Grant Program or the application process, we invite you to join Dr. Michael McDonell on our next webinar, Wednesday September 4, 2019 10:30-11:30AM PST. Dr. McDonell will review applicant eligibility as well as requirements for the letter of intent and the grant application, and will answer webinar attendees’ questions. Please Register Here

Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Update

The Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s Outreach, Recruitment, and Education Core (ADRC ORE) participated in two major events in 2018: the 39th Annual Yakama Elders Luncheon held in Toppenish, WA, in May, and the National Indian Council on Aging’s biennial elder’s conference held in Temecula, CA, in September. We are reviewing the data from the more than 1,000 surveys our team collected at the events and hope to publish results soon. Our team has also presented information about Alzheimer’s disease at 15 tribal clinics in Washington. We hope to visit the remaining clinics throughout 2019. Project lead and P4NH staff scientist Meghan Jernigan has been invited to attend the Kalispel Tribe’s 2019 “Warriors Dance Against Diabetes” in Cusick, WA, on Saturday, March 30. Ms. Jernigan will be staffing a table at the event and will show a short film about the effects of Alzheimer’s disease on a Native family

Project Update: Strong Heart Stroke Study 2

The Strong Heart Stroke Study 2 (SHSS2), or Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center-Satellite Core Expansion: Cerebrovascular Disease and its Consequences in American Indians (ADRC – SCE: CDCAI), is entering its last year of participant recruitment and data collection. We have recruited 340 participants and expect to recruit at least 50 more participants by July or August 2019. Once this stage is finished, the team will complete data entry, data cleaning, and data management using statistical analytic software and/or programming tools, STATA and/or R. The team hopes the study will increase knowledge of Alzheimer’s warning signs and link American Indian elders with needed services.

Caring Contacts: A Strength-Based Suicide Prevention Trial In 4 Native Communities Project Update

Phase 2 of the Caring Contacts study is now underway, and all sites are actively enrolling participants. In Phase 2, we have applied the cultural adaptation feedback gathered in Phase 1 and are conducting a randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of the culturally tailored Caring Contacts intervention. With the cultural adaptation of the study intervention, one of our aims is to increase social connectedness with study participants, with the goal of decreasing suicidal ideation and attempts.