Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Partnerships for Native Health Washington State University

Native Center For Alcohol Research And Education Call For Applications

The primary intent of the Native Center for Alcohol Research and Education (NCARE) Pilot Project Grant Program is to fund and foster innovative research projects that focus on reducing the burden of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. The secondary intent of the Pilot Project Grant Program is to support and provide mentorship to junior investigators during the development of their novel approaches to improving the lives of AI/AN people.

This call for grant applications is to promote research projects that focus on reducing the burden of alcohol use disorders in AI/AN communities that will subsequently lead to future external funding. Preference will be given to junior investigators, although mid-career and senior researchers who have not conducted alcohol intervention research in Native communities are also eligible to apply. Please refer to the NCARE website for an overview video, full application details, and application forms.

Initial application materials must be submitted for first review by September 30, 2019, at 4:30PM PST.

If you are interested in learning more about the NCARE Pilot Project Grant Program or the application process, we invite you to join Dr. Michael McDonell on our next webinar, Wednesday September 4, 2019 10:30-11:30AM PST. Dr. McDonell will review applicant eligibility as well as requirements for the letter of intent and the grant application, and will answer webinar attendees’ questions. Please Register Here

Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Update

The Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s Outreach, Recruitment, and Education Core (ADRC ORE) participated in two major events in 2018: the 39th Annual Yakama Elders Luncheon held in Toppenish, WA, in May, and the National Indian Council on Aging’s biennial elder’s conference held in Temecula, CA, in September. We are reviewing the data from the more than 1,000 surveys our team collected at the events and hope to publish results soon. Our team has also presented information about Alzheimer’s disease at 15 tribal clinics in Washington. We hope to visit the remaining clinics throughout 2019. Project lead and P4NH staff scientist Meghan Jernigan has been invited to attend the Kalispel Tribe’s 2019 “Warriors Dance Against Diabetes” in Cusick, WA, on Saturday, March 30. Ms. Jernigan will be staffing a table at the event and will show a short film about the effects of Alzheimer’s disease on a Native family

Project Update: Strong Heart Stroke Study 2

The Strong Heart Stroke Study 2 (SHSS2), or Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center-Satellite Core Expansion: Cerebrovascular Disease and its Consequences in American Indians (ADRC – SCE: CDCAI), is entering its last year of participant recruitment and data collection. We have recruited 340 participants and expect to recruit at least 50 more participants by July or August 2019. Once this stage is finished, the team will complete data entry, data cleaning, and data management using statistical analytic software and/or programming tools, STATA and/or R. The team hopes the study will increase knowledge of Alzheimer’s warning signs and link American Indian elders with needed services.

Caring Contacts: A Strength-Based Suicide Prevention Trial In 4 Native Communities Project Update

Phase 2 of the Caring Contacts study is now underway, and all sites are actively enrolling participants. In Phase 2, we have applied the cultural adaptation feedback gathered in Phase 1 and are conducting a randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of the culturally tailored Caring Contacts intervention. With the cultural adaptation of the study intervention, one of our aims is to increase social connectedness with study participants, with the goal of decreasing suicidal ideation and attempts.

Prevention Of Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy (AEP) In American Indian Communities: A Pre-Conception Approach Webinar Available

In this webinar Drs. Michelle Sarche and Jessica Hanson explained the importance of a preconceptual approach to alcohol-exposed pregnancy prevention, detailing efforts to prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancy in American Indian communities in particular. They discussed how these efforts have informed the design and implementation of a new randomized controlled trial of Native-Changing High-risk Alcohol Use and Increasing Contraception Effectiveness Study (Native CHOICES) (an adaptation of CHOICES) with one Northern Plains American Indian community.

The webinar was presented on May 13th as part of the Native Center for Alcohol Research Education (NCARE) Webinar Series.

Presentation slides can be viewed and downloaded here.

Research Center Update: NAD-RCMAR

NAD-RCMAR funds social and behavioral pilot studies that advance the field through its Research Education Program, a career development program that provides early- to mid-career investigators the skills and mentorship to better advance Alzheimer’s disease research. » More ...

Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Update

The Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s Outreach, Recruitment, and Education Core (ADRC ORE) participated in two major events in 2018: the 39th Annual Yakama Elders Luncheon held in Toppenish, WA, in May, and the National Indian Council on Aging’s biennial elder’s conference held in Temecula, CA, in September. » More ...

Project Update: AI STOMP

The American Indians Stop Smoking by Mobile Phone (AI STOMP) project has finished recruitment, with 346 participants from five states enrolling in the study. » More ...

Project Update: Rhythm And Timing Exercises

The Rhythm and Timing Exercises for Cerebrovascular Disease in Older American Indians study is in its final project year. The study has about 75% of its required research cohort, and recruitment should finish this year. In April, Principal Investigator Lonnie Nelson and Research Coordinator Trevor Slaney will visit one of the research sites to discuss the importance of research in collaboration with Native communities and explain how the study engages the community.